Mary Cassatt Prints: In the Company of Women

Mary Cassatt: The Parrot, 1890
Sep 29, 2012 - Mar 03, 2013
Eisenberg Gallery

Initially trained in Philadelphia, Mary Cassatt (1844–1926) pursued her artistic career in Paris, where she was invited to join the Impressionist group of painters in 1877. Inspired by the experimental prints being made by her artist friends Edgar Degas and Camille Pissarro, Cassatt made her first prints during the late 1870s and early 1880s. In 1890 she created a remarkable series of 12 drypoints, showcasing a wide range of technical effects. This exhibition of 23 works features the Zimmerli’s holdings of Mary Cassatt’s prints, including a rare complete set of the 12 drypoints from 1890. Works such as Tea and The Map demonstrate Cassatt’s sensitive portrayal of contemporary women, as well as her virtuosity. Also featured are five of Cassatt’s innovative color prints, lent by a private collection, including In the Omnibus, The Fitting (both 1890–91), and Under the Horse-Chestnut Tree (1896–97). Cassatt’s major technical achievements in color intaglio printmaking sealed her reputation among the world’s most gifted printmakers.

Organized by Christine Giviskos, Associate Curator of European Art, and Marilyn Symmes, Director of the Morse Research Center for Graphic Arts and Curator of Prints and Drawings

Mary Cassatt 

The Parrot, 1890 


Collection Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers

Gift of the Raymond V. Carpenter Estate

Photo Peter Jacobs